An Education on Selling Your Junk Car to Gershow

After four years of high school, your child is off to college. Since your child will be going away, that means hitting the stores to get the things they need for the classroom and the dorm room. Families surveyed by the National Retail Federation said they intend to spend an average of $1,059.20 to get their children ready for college. This amount breaks last year’s record of $976.78 per family.

Of this amount, families are expected to lay out $129.76 in dorm furnishings, compared to $120.19 last year, and an average of $83.78 on school supplies, more than in 2019 ($71.92). Sixty percent of families also planned to buy a computer or electronics for their college-bound children. The average expenditure was estimated at $261.52, higher than last year’s amount of $234.69.

The biggest expenditure is textbooks: students are expected to spend an average of $1,298, according to the College Board. Experts say students can either rent textbooks or buy used ones to save money.

Here is a lesson in paying for these expenses: if you have a junk car sitting in front of your home that you no longer drive, you can get money for your car by selling it to Gershow Recycling. They will tow away your car for free and pay you top dollar for your unwanted vehicle.

It doesn’t matter how old your car is, what condition it is in or if it’s running or not. Gershow buys all types of vehicles. Each year, Gershow buys thousands of junk cars from hardworking Long Islanders and puts cold, hard cash back in their pockets.

Gershow has nine convenient locations in Suffolk and Nassau Counties and Brooklyn. If you need money for back-to-college shopping, sell your junk vehicle to Gershow today. Call (631) 371-2031 or visit https://clunkersintocash.com/.

 

RESOURCES:

https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/pay-for-college/college-costs/quick-guide-college-costs

https://www.collegechoice.net/college-life-3/what-are-the-major-expenses-for-students/

https://nrf.com/media-center/press-releases/coronavirus-could-push-back-school-spending-record-level-uncertain

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *